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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/19325

Title: LANGUAGE LEARNING STRATEGIES: INVESTIGATING THE EFFECT OF EXPLICIT L1 STRATEGY INSTRUCTION ON ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNING OF KING SAUD UNIVERSITY FEMALE STUDENTS IN SAUDI ARABIA
Authors: Abumelha, May Abdulaziz
Saleh, Mahmoud Ismael
Keywords: LANGUAGE LEARNING STRATEGIES
EFFECT OF EXPLICIT L1 STRATEGY
ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNING
KING SAUD UNIVERSITY
FEMALE STUDENTS IN SAUDI ARABIA
Issue Date: 11-Jun-2008
Abstract: This study aimed at investigating the relationship between explicit first language strategy instruction and language learning among Saudi female English majors at King Saud University. The study examined whether there will be a difference in strategy use after strategy instruction. Moreover, the study also investigated the effect of the strategy course on subjects’ language proficiency level by the end of the semester in three different skills reading, writing, and listening. There are four null hypotheses underlying the study stating that subjects of the experimental group will not show a significant increase in strategy use, nor will they have a significant improvement over the control group in reading, writing, and listening. Data was obtained by the use of many instruments. The strategy use questionnaire “Strategy Inventory of Language Learning” SILL by Oxford (1990) was conducted before and after the treatment. In addition, subjects’ scores in three language skills’ exams were obtained to serve as pretests and posttests. The subjects were female English major students of ‘level two’ at the College of Languages and Translation. The study adopted a pretest-posttest control group quasi- experimental design. An explicit L1 strategy instruction course was given to the experimental group in six one-hour lectures over the period of seven weeks. The data obtained was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. A paired-samples t-test was conducted on the results of the questionnaire and its three main subdivisions, and on the scores from the pretests and posttests of reading, writing, and listening. Subjects were subdivided into two groups in both the experimental and control groups. The first subgroup included students who came from private schools and studied English for 12 years prior to the university level. The second subgroup was consisted of students who came from public schools and studied English following the Saudi English curricula for only 6 years before the university level. One-way analysis of variance ANOVA with post-hoc tests were used to compare results between those subgroups. The study found that there was no significant improvement in strategy use, reading, writing, and listening in favor of the experimental group. Therefore, the four null hypotheses underlying the study were accepted. Moreover, students from the experimental group had a statistically significant decrease in metacognitive strategy use, and reading compared to their own pretests. However, t-tests between the groups showed subjects in the control and experimental groups to be of an equal proficiency level before and after the experiment regardless of the strategy instruction course given to the later. Finally, the ANOVA showed significant differences between subjects of the experimental group who came from private schools over subjects from the same experimental group coming from public schools in favor of the former in reading, listening and overall proficiency.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/19325
Appears in Collections:College of Arts

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