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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/8980

Title: The effect of dietary concentrate level and poultry offal meal supplementation on cholesterol content of Najdi lambs muscle
Authors: M. Y. Al-Saiady
Abouheif, M. A
A. E. Tag Eldin
Issue Date: 1996
Publisher: J. King Saud Univ., Agric. Sci., 8: 235- 242
Abstract: Total lipid and cholesterol content in longissimus muscle and carcass soft tissue from Najdi ram lambs as affected by dietary concentrate level and poultry offal meal supplementation (POM) were studied. Sixty lambs, weighing 23.5 kg were assigned to a 2X3 factorial arrangement consisting of two dietary concentrate levels (high; 79% concentrate or low; 25% concentrate) and three POM supplementation (0, 5 and 10%); POM replaced as equal amount o soybean meal in the diet. All six diets were isonitrogenous (14.9% CP) and diets within each dietary concentrate level were isocaloric (high; 11.7 and low; 9.0 MJ ME/kg DM). Lambs were individually given ad libitum access to feed for 120 days before slaughter. The results showed that no significant differences were detected in total lipid content and cholesterol content of longissimus muscle or carcass soft tissue between various levels of POM supplementation. High-concentrate fed lambs had more (P<0.01) total lipid content in their longissimus muscle and carcass soft tissue than low-fed lambs. Dietary concentrate level had no effect on longissimus muscle cholesterol concentration, whereas carcass soft tissue from high-concentrate fed lambs had less (P<0.01) cholesterol concentration than those from low-concentrate group. The overall least
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/8980
Appears in Collections:College of Foods And Agricultural Science

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